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White-Fronted Capuchin

CONSERVATION STATUS : LEAST CONCERN
COMMON EXTINCT
Classification:

Other Common Names: Ring-tailed Monkey, Organ-grinder Monkey
Order: Primates
Genus & Species: Cebus albifrons
Family: Cebidae

Status:

Listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Range:

Central and South America. Found in the Andes at elevations of 7,000 feet.

Habitat:

Forest and occasionally mangrove swamps. Adapted well to the presence of humans.

Activity:

Diurnal.

Size:

12 to 22 inches head to body. 3 to 8 pounds.

Longevity:

Up to 46 years in captivity.

Diet:

Seeds, nuts, leaves, berries, small invertebrates such as insects and spiders, eggs, and small rodents.

Description:

White face, arms and chest. Like all New World monkeys, the nostrils are at the side of the nose, in contrast to Old World monkeys in which the nostrils are close together and in the front of the nose. The slightly prehensile tail is covered with long fur. The capuchin’s body is slender, limbs thin. The thumbs and big toes are opposable. The head is round with short dark hairs on the back.

Reproduction:

Gestation: About 6 months.

Offspring: Usually 1.

Parental Care: When very young, baby clings to mother and travels everywhere with her. Nurses for 6 to 9 months.

Ecology, Adaptations, Etc:

Highly social. These primates form groups of up to 30 individuals, traveling and foraging together. The home range for the troop may be quite large (92 acres reported). They have a variety of communication sounds by which group members keep in contact with one another. To maintain a sense of direction and mark territory, they scent mark the surrounding foliage by wetting their feet and hands with urine (urine-washing).  They descend from trees only to drink. Females are sexually mature at 4 years, males at 8.

Comments:

Capuchins were once common as organ-grinder monkeys in circuses and road shows.  They are occasionally kept as pets today.